Rooney Bloom: The Joy of “Greens”

Some time ago, I shared a bit about my personal journey with mental health. I have always been an anxious person. However, when my daughter Ana was born in 2016, I began battling postpartum anxiety

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My little cutie at two months – too bad being cute doesn’t stop postpartum depression or anxiety from rearing its ugly head!

It didn’t help that my youngest son August – not even three-years-old at the time – was hospitalized due to uncontrollable febrile seizures just two months after her birth. The postpartum anxiety, coupled with very real concerns about August’s health, turned me into a giant hot mess.

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Holding my sweet boy during his hospital stay

I like to think that I held it together pretty well on the outside, but looking back, I’m not sure…because inside, I was completely falling apart. Anything and everything caused me excess anxiety, and as a result, I began experiencing other issues with my health.

Finally, I reached the point where I knew I needed to do something – anything – to make things better. So I did two things that changed my path: I went to my doctor and was prescribed medication to manage my anxiety; and I pursued a hobby that would allow me to unwind and find rest for my mind and body – namely, working with houseplants.

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Today, I am still medicated and still battle anxiety, but it is nowhere near as serious as it was two years ago. Also, I continue to work with my plants on a daily basis; they still bring me the same sense of “internal quiet” that they did when I first began my plant journey.

Today I am honored to feature a guest post by Eric Rooney, of Rooney Bloom. Previously a teacher in more formal settings, Eric is passionate about teaching and sharing the benefits plants to people’s physical and emotional bodies.

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I began my early career as a teacher, predominantly teaching science in middle grade education. I dabbled in formal teaching, technology in San Francisco, and retail work but my creativity and, as some would call it, ADHD had me going somewhere else. I didn’t feel content.  I wasn’t consciously aware of it, but I hadn’t yet found what made me “tick”.

In 2015, I lived in San Francisco, and was let go from my highest paying job ever. As you probably know, living in San Francisco (where rent is the highest in the USA) with no job meant, well, hurry the F up and start making money, or move along.  Rent alone was over 3k a month, and I had a background in education. California doesn’t make it easy to become certified to teach in their public schools, and I was NOT about to go back to making a mere 28k a year teaching young adolescents, nor could I afford to. I felt as though I was slowly losing my sanity, my connection to the earth, and people!

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Image courtesy of Rooney Bloom

To stay motivated, I’d get up early and head to the flower mart, continually filling my windows with plants and fresh cuts. I’d design and create with flowers, offering them to neighbors as a gift. I’d buy cheap plants at the Wednesday farmers markets, repot them, and bring them home.  I’d freak out when I had a new bloom, a new leaf, yelling to my partner “LOOK! There’s a new leaf! She loves it in our apartment.”  He often told me, “No more plants, we don’t have the room.”  But still, I’d come home with fresh cuts, waiting to be styled, or a new plant, looking for a new, upcycled pot!

I loved it.  I loved seeing plants change, and react to my touch and care.  I loved knowing their care was dependent on me, their next bloom was reliant on if I remembered to water.  I was intrigued by their ability to break down carbon dioxide and produce clean, fresh, oxygen that my body needed.  I got excited to see a new bloom or a little tiny teeny baby leaf that wasn’t even a leaf yet. Slowly I, myself, began to transform and to find significant pieces of peace and tranquility allowing my soul to rest. My plant “disease” was quickly spreading.

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Image courtesy of Rooney Bloom

I learned a deeper foundation of care.  Knowing that not any two plants smell, grow, or produce the same, kind of like humans. I was taught about patience as I waited for my plants to product the next blooms or my cacti to grow (because golly, grow slowly!)  Japanese Maple bonsai trees from seed take weeks to germinate alone, and the joy I felt when they finally broke the soil is indescribable.  I didn’t at first feel and notice these things; it took time, repetition, and a little coaxing. It took paying attention and slowing down, and I really have learned it’s a must to “stop and smell the roses.”

I will forever be learning from and with plants. They continually allow me to grow up and learn. They also provide a fount of connection, worth, and community. Plants have connected civilizations since the beginning of time, and I now venture to connect people with horticultural and plants, discovering what they offer for each personal individually.

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Image courtesy of Rooney Bloom

I now work full time, lifting humans’ subconscious love and “underground” connection to plants to a conscience level for full benefit. With my roots being anchored in education, I know it’s my role to make plant knowledge and horticultural benefits known, sharing and teaching them to others.  I am now involved with plants in a variety of ways, including organic, pesticide-free farming, floral design, free home foliage advice, native landscape design, heirloom gardening, and even classes on floral crowns; these lovely “greens” are changing lives.

I owe much of my own personal happiness to plants, as do we all: our clean oxygen, the colors we see, the smells we enjoy, all that our sun allows to flourish. The benefits of plants are real: they reduce stress, increase motivation, promote better sleep, clean the air, enhance creativity, promote relaxation, give you more energy – the list goes on and on!

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Image courtesy of Rooney Bloom

My personal desire is share this love of plants with anyone and everyone. Not only do I have a store located in Denver, CO, but I also offer consultations if you just need some plant-related help. If you have general questions about how to properly care for your plants, check out the “Common Questions” link on my page. Also, you can give me a follow on Instagram (@rooney_bloom) to indulge in the magic and healing of plants.

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Plants have changed my life. I’d love to help them change yours!

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The 8 Best Plants for Your Space: Low Light

Recently, I have been adding to my side-hustle ventures (because I needed one more thing to do, right??), and have been selling some baby plants. As I have interacted with customers through this process, I have learned that most people don’t know which plants will do well in their spaces. This makes me think that perhaps there isn’t enough information out there (or people don’t know where to look) about what plants do well in different types of light.

And thus this three-part series – The Best Plants for Your Space – was born. Together, we will look at some of the best plants for your space based on the plant’s light requirement. I hope this will be helpful information!

When I first got started with houseplants, I had a cute little hanging planter that was designed to mount on the wall. I planted a succulent (which needed bright light) in the planter…and promptly hung it on a wall that was far from a window. I couldn’t figure out why my plant wasn’t thriving – that is, until I learned more about plants.

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Low light planters in my house – now holding the CORRECT plants for their location!

Today, we are going to look at plants that enjoy low light – the type of plant that would have been perfect in my little wall planter!

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ZZ plants do great in low light. In fact, once I was told that they could even survive in florescent light ONLY. (Dang, these guys are resilient!) ZZ plants also enjoy a dry environment. They are a great plant for beginners, as they basically thrive on neglect!

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Snake plants are another plant that does well in low light. I have seen in my own home, though, that while they will survive in low light, they will produce more growth when they are in moderate light. However, I have several stuck in dark corners because they look so dang cool there, and the plants are doing great. Keep in mind that snake plants need to dry out completely between waterings.

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Ivy – specifically English ivy – does well in low light settings. I have kept several varieties in my own home, and they are pretty hardy all-around. Just keep in mind they are another variety that likes to dry out between waterings.

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Pothos is a great go-to plant for beginners. Not only is it easy to find and relatively cheap to buy, but it is super forgiving. Pothos does best in low to moderate light and should be allowed to dry out between waterings to prevent root-rot. If you are new to houseplants, this is definitely a plant that you should try out!

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Philodendrons, similarly to pothos, are great for beginners as many of the varieties are very forgiving. They do well in low to moderate light and like to be allowed to dry out between waterings. Plus, there are so many different varieties – some that trail/vine, others that are more “bushy” – that it’s impossible to get bored.

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Ferns – specifically button, rabbit’s foot, and maidenhair ferns – are great for low-light spaces; however, I will warn you – they are a little less user-friendly than some of the plants on this list. Typically, ferns like to have their soil kept moist and don’t like any direct light.

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Peace lilies are not only great for keeping the air in your home clean but are also a plant that does well in low light. They like having soil that is consistently moist; if allowed to dry out, they will dramatically “wilt,” although they can usually be revived with a good drink of water.

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Calatheas are another plant that thrives in low light, but they can be finicky. (I, personally, have lost several calatheas by not providing the correct conditions for them.) They thrive in soil that is constantly moist, and they also appreciate high air humidity.

If you are new to houseplants and have low-light spaces, I would definitely recommend starting off with a pothos or philodendron. If you are more experienced with houseplants but are looking to fill a dark corner, you may feel brave enough to take on a fern or calathea.

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What if you have areas that get a medium amount of light? Check back next time to learn about plants that would be perfect in that space!

- the {house}plant momma.png

A Tale of Two Grandmas: Houseplants and COPD

Growing up, I had the privilege of having two, wonderful grandmas. They were as different as night and day, but both of them were special ladies.

My Mimi was a firecracker. She was always teaching my brother and I to do things that my mom hated (i.e. flipping off my grandpa behind a menu at a restaurant or letting us watch TV shows that my mom would NEVER let us watch). We loved it, and thought she was the coolest grandma ever!

Whenever my Mimi would visit, I would drag her to my room for some “talk time,” and would share my little world with her: boys, trainer bras, best friend drama – you name it. When I got older, I would talk to her every Sunday on the phone like clockwork.

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A sweet moment between my Mimi and I (circa 1987)

My Grandma Joyce was the complete opposite. While she was sassy in her own right, she enjoyed teaching my brother and I church songs while she played the piano or would make (terribly inaccurate) birdcalls for us. When we would go visit her, we would enjoy roaming around her property in Indiana, looking for fossils in her creek bed and fishing in her pond.

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My Grandma Joyce and I (circle 1988)

Despite these women’s differences, they both were hit by the same affliction at the end of their lives: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Mimi had COPD from her life-long smoking habit – an addiction that she just couldn’t kick. Grandma Joyce smoked when she was younger, but stopped when she was older. Yet the damage was done.

Both of my grandmothers died with COPD; because of this, COPD is a topic that is close to my heart. I am honored today to have guest writer Erin Lowry of 1stClass Medical sharing how houseplants can have a positive impact on those who struggle with COPD.

– the {house}plant momma

COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) is a progressive disease that makes breathing continually harder to do. COPD is a broad term that covers multiple lung diseases, such as emphysema, chronic bronchitis, and asthma. These diseases can trigger coughing, which in turn causes an excess amount of mucus, wheezing, chest tightness, as well as other similar symptoms.

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Image from British Lung Foundation

While cigarette smoke is a main cause of COPD, you do not necessarily need to smoke a day in your life to get COPD. Any harmful pollutant in the air can also cause COPD; additionally, constant exposure to those pollutants (smoke included) can worsen the effects of COPD. Minimizing these triggers means doing what you can to avoid the irritant or keeping your home clean to lower the amount of pollutants in your home.

Many respiratory patients spend roughly 90% of their time indoors, as outside air has been believed to cause COPD flare-ups. However, according to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), there may actually be more indoor air pollutants than outdoor air pollutants. One reason is that many homes now have a better seals against the outside, which helps them be more energy efficient. However, this process also locks in pollutants. Also, pollutants such as harsh fumes from cleaners, dust, and pollen can get inside and embed themselves into carpets and upholstery. All of this may mean the home is not as safe for COPD patients as they might think.

A safe and relatively easy way to reduce these pollutants in your home is to invest in houseplants. Indoor plants are known to reduce harmful pollutants from the air by up to 87% in only 24 hours! How, you might ask? Plants use the process of photosynthesis to take in carbon dioxide and other pollutants in the air, and in turn, release clean oxygen. By absorbing the unhealthy gases and releasing clean gases, plants can help clean the air; this is much easier – and cheaper – than paying for an expensive machine to clean the air for you!

In 1989, NASA put together a list of plants they believe to help clean indoor air the most efficiently. English ivy, peace lilies, flamingo lilies, variegated snake plants, chrysanthemums, and bamboo palms are all great plants to remove many pollutants in the air.

If you aren’t familiar with these plants, here is some basic information about them.

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English Ivy: English ivy needs to be grow in a shaded area with rich soil; it should be watered enough to keep the soil moist. It’s vines can grow up to 50 feet long – or more – over time.

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Peace Lily: Peace lilies need partial shade, but can survive off virtually no sun at all. They should be watered when they start to droop.

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Flamingo Lily: Flamingo lilies are from the rainforest, so they enjoy growing in a humid area, in a pot of moss-based soil. This lily requires enough water to keep the soil moist; however, do not allow the soil to get overly wet and make sure the pot has a way to drain.

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Snake Plants: Snake plants grow best in a pot with good drainage or in a soilless potting mix, so that it does not get overly moist. These plants can handle indirect sunlight, and only need to be watered when the soil dries out.

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Chrysanthemums: These plants need regular watering, poured under their leaves to avoid any fungus growth. Chrysanthemums do not like humidity and only bloom for 3-4 weeks total, leaving behind their beautiful leaves.

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Bamboo Palm: Bamboo palms only need indirect or filtered light. They like to have their soil kept moist, but be careful not to overwater, as it can lead to root rot.

All of the best plants for the air quality are also fairly low maintenance. This makes it easier for those with COPD and other respiratory diseases to maintain a plant without having to constantly provide care for it. Many of the plants listed only require enough water to keep the soil moist and a minimal amount of indirect light.

It should be noted that many of these plants are not pet friendly. If you have pets, make sure you get non-toxic plants or keep your plants in places you are confident your pet cannot reach. (To learn more about plants that are pet safe, click here).

Before bringing home any plant, I recommend making sure you are well educated about the plant you are buying. Speaking with a specialist at your local nursery or garden store, or doing research online, can help ensure you know how to care for the plant in your climate and region.

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A note of caution: If you aren’t careful, an over-watered plant can produce mold; this will have the exact opposite effect of the plants air cleaning purpose.

Houseplants have many benefits for their owners, but for those with COPD, those benefits can be life – and health – altering!

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Pesky Plant Pests

Warning: This post is full of gross creepy things. But it’s also full of cute (old!) pictures of my hubby and I on our honeymoon, so…balance, right?

June 20, 2010. Andres and I walked down the aisle, said “I do,” kissed, and the next day, headed to Tulum, Mexico to celebrate the beginning of our life together. While there, we stayed at a gorgeous bed and breakfast out in the jungle. As we were given a tour of the facilities upon our arrival, we thought we must have arrived in paradise.

Our room was decorated in quaint, authentic Mexican décor, and was surrounded by several small, private swimming pools. A hammock swung lazily on our private porch. A masseuse could be scheduled to give you a private massage in a beautiful jungle villa.

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Private pool at our B&B! A dream!
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Fresh fruit every morning for breakfast
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Beautiful artwork in our room

It was great…’til nighttime. Turns out our room had no air-conditioning. June in Tulum can be described in two words: hot and humid. Andres and I laid in our bed, covers kicked off, ceiling fan going full blast, just trying to feel one tiny gust of cool air. Sleep felt impossible.

As soon as I dozed off, Andres woke me, speaking in a quiet, overly-calm voice. “Allison. Wake up and get out of bed.” I sleepily sat up, wondering what was going on. After only a moment, Andres told me to go back to sleep, that everything was fine. It wasn’t until the next morning that he told me a cockroach had been on my pillow, approaching my face.

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A cockroach caught in our room

During our honeymoon our days were full of fantastic memories – beach walking, snorkeling with tropical fish, Andres losing his wedding ring in the deeps of the ocean (that’s another story for another day), delicious food, treats from street vendors, shopping at the little local shops. Yes, the days were wonderful.

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Beach days!
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Tacos at a road-side stand for dinner – YUM!

But the nights… Oh yes, the nights brought many shudder-worthy pests. Our room was actually equipped with a “pik-stick” (like elderly people might use to pick up something our of reach on the floor) to collect pests and keep them at arm’s length.

While there, we saw more than our share of cockroaches, giant spiders with glinty eyes, a scorpion in the eves over our bed, and a GIANT whip scorpion (which looks like a humongous spider) in our shower.

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Oh hey, scorpion in the eves above my bed…
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This is a terrible picture, but this is a whip scorpion…in my shower…and then it charged at me and all of Mexico heard me scream.

Let me tell you: pests like that have a way of stealing the romance RIGHT out of your honeymoon. (But they also give you HILARIOUS stories to tell later!)

Unfortunately, pests are just a part of life. And, when you have houseplants, pests just come along with the territory. The important thing is that you understand plant pests before you get them. If you have this understanding, you can more effectively treat them before they do some serious damage to your plant family.
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Aphids are one of the most commonly found houseplant pests. These insects pierce plants with their mouthparts and drink out the sap inside the plant. After eating, the excrete a sticky, sweet “honeydew.” This leaves a residue on plants, which then attracts other pests, especially ants, or can even create a black, sooty mold.

What pest looks like:

  • small (1/8 inch), soft-bodied, and pear-shaped; can be green, yellow, brown, red or black in color
  • adults are typically wingless, but if populations are high, they can grow wings
  • two whip-like antennae on the tip of the head and a pair of tube-like structures projecting backwards on their hindquarters

 Signs of pest:

  • sticky residue (honeydew) on plants
  • black, sooty mold caused by honeydew
  • presence of insects

 Treating pest:

  • prune off any infected areas on the plant
  • spray plant with a strong stream of water, knocking off most of the population
  • crush remaining bugs between fingers

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The common whitefly is a nasty little pest that don’t discriminate when it comes to what type of houseplants they infest. They lay their eggs on the undersides of leaves while they eat; the eggs hatch in less than a week. Once hatched, the nymphs act similar to scale: they crawl a short distance, plant themselves, and suck the plant until they go into a dormant phase. They remain dormant for approximately two weeks, before emerging as adults and beginning the process over again.

What the pest looks like:

  • moderately small (1/16 inch); moth-like insects with white wings and short antenna

Signs of pest:

  • stunted plant growth, leaf yellowing
  • sticky residue (honeydew) on plants
  • black, sooty mold caused by honeydew
  • presence of insects

Treating pest:

  • yellow sticky traps (as they are attracted to the color yellow)
  • spray plant with a strong stream of water, knocking off most of the population

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Fungus gnats are common in homes with houseplants – especially where humidity/moisture is high. They look similar to fruit flies, and many times are mistaken as such. While the adults are mostly just a pain in the butt, the larvae (which are laid in the soil) can damage tender plant roots.

What pest looks like:

  • adults: grayish-black; somewhat resemble mosquitos with long legs and one pair of clear wings; 1/8 inch long.
  • larvae: shiny black head; long whitish (or transparent) body; about 1/4 inch long.

Signs of pest:

  • sudden wilting, poor growth, or yellowing of a plant
  • presence of insects

Treating pest:

  • sticky traps
  • add sand to the top of the soil
  • top soil with cinnamon (which I have tried, and found successful)
  • spraying soil with a 3 parts water: 1 part hydrogen peroxide mixture to kill larvae


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While mealybugs are an unarmored insect, they are difficult to control because they move. This means that if another plant is touching an infected plant, there’s the possibility that the mealybugs will transfer from one plant to another. Mealybugs are another species that feed on the sap of a plant; they insert their long sucking mouthparts into the plant and draw out the sap.

What pest looks like:

  • small (1/10-1/14 inch), oval-shaped, white or gray in color
  • covered in a mealy wax
  • active early on but move little once they begin feeding

Signs of pest:

  • in small numbers, damage might not be apparent
  • leaf yellowing and curling
  • sticky residue (honeydew) on plants
  • black, sooty mold caused by honeydew
  • presence of insects

Treating pest:

  • prune out light infestations
  • dab insects with a Q-tip dipped in rubbing alcohol
  • do not overwater or over-fertilize, as mealybugs are attracted to plants with high nitrogen levels and soft growth areas

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Scale is a sap-sucking insect that attaches itself to plants – specifically twigs, leaves, and branches. They are immobile and many times can be mistaken for simply a bump on a branch. Because of this, an infestation can occur unnoticed. They also secrete honeydew, which can attract other pests.

What pest looks like:

  • oddly-shaped, immobile pest that resemble bumps on a plant
  • armored scale: small (1/8 inch), secrete a hard protective covering over themselves; immobile; do not secrete honeydew
  • soft scale: larger (up to1/2 inch), secrete a waxy film that is part of their body able to move (but rarely do); secrete large amounts of honeydew

Signs of pest:

  • small bumps on twigs, leaves, branches, etc. where scale insects are attached, drinking sap out of the plant
  • sticky residue (honeydew) on plants (soft scale only)
  • black, sooty mold caused by honeydew (soft scale only)
  • presence of insects

Treating pest:

  • prune off any infected areas on the plant
  • pick off the scale by hand, or rub off using a solution of water and alcohol – if infected area is small
  • apply neem oil with cotton ball – if infected area is small

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I had a small spider mite outbreak recently. I had a calathea that had struggling, but was on the mend; one day when I was checking her out, examining her leaves, I noticed some webbing. At first, I thought perhaps it had been a while since I looked at her, but then I saw tiny little spiders moving on the webbing.

I freaked. I checked every plant near her and then I did what every good plant parent does: I took pictures. Looking at those tiny spiders up close through the camera lens was totally gross and unnerving. I didn’t know what to do…so I tossed the whole plant.

Spider mites are a concern to plants because they are yet another sap-sucking pest. They live on the underside of leaves; they feed by piercing the leaves and drinking the sap. Feeding marks appear as light dots on the leaves.

What pest looks like:

  • spider mites are not true insects, but are classified as arachnids, a relative of “real” spiders
  • adults are reddish brown or a pale color, oval-shaped, and tiny (about 1/50 inch long)
  • immature spider mites look similar, just smaller

Signs of pest:

  • may appear to be “dust” on the bottom of leaves
  • appear most in hot, dry conditions
  • large populations of spider mites are accompanied by a fine webbing
  • feeding marks (light dots) on leaves
  • presence of spider mites

Treating pest:

  • spray off leaves either outdoors or in a shower; leave plant in a humid environment to help rid of spider mites (they hate humidity!)
  • prune off any infected areas and any webbing, and discard of it in the trash.
  • entire plant may need to be disposed of infection is too severe

Keep in mind that chemical pesticides can actually encourage the spread of spider mites by killing of beneficial insects that prey on the mites. Spider mites are also known to quickly develop a resistance to various pesticides. Use these products with caution!
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Thrips are a pest that damages plants by drinking their juices and scraping at fruits, flowers, and leaves. They are a commonly found pest in greenhouses and indoor/outdoor gardens.

What pest looks like:

  • very small (less than 1/25 inch); straw-colored or black and slender; two pairs of feathery wings
  • thrips are extremely active and feed in large groups

Signs of pest:

  • leaves turn pale, splotchy, and slivery, then die
  • injured plants are discolored, scarred, and deformed
  • presence of insects, typically in groups

Treating pest:

  • discard any infested plants by securely bagging and putting in the trash
  • blue sticky traps
  • wash plant with a smothering insecticidal soaps made of naturally-occurring plant oils and fats
  • apply neem oil with cotton ball

Thrips tend to congregate on the underside of leaves and where leaves attach to the stem; when treating a plant for thrips, focus especially on these areas. Also, thrips especially seem to like philodendrons. In these plants, a sign of their presence is a yellowing of the leaves.

A few items to note:

  • There are many products available on the market for treating each of these pests. Many of them have mixed reviews. Since I, myself, have never tried any of them and prefer to use more organic methods, I have not discussed these products in this blog.
  • When using neem oil, be sure to read the package and dilute, dilute, dilute! If you don’t, you can actually suffocate your plant and cause more damage than the pest itself.
  • With any infestation, it is vital that you quarantine your plant as soon as you notice a pest. This will allow you to treat the plant without running the risk of the pest spreading to other plants. In my home, I actually move the plant to a room all by itself. (Since my house is always in the process of renovations, I move the infected plant into our “construction room.”)

If you want to learn more about controlling these, as well as other, pests that frequently attack houseplants, check out these helpful resources:

How to Identify Common Houseplant Pests – By Homestead Brooklyn

Houseplant Pests – By Planet Natural

**Special thanks to my friend Devoney Mills, manager at Stump in German Village, for her willingness to share her personal experience (and experiences of Stump customers) as I developed this blog. Her expertise and knowledge has truly been priceless!

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All of these creepy pests give me the willies! Gross! So, one might ask, what can you do to prevent these pests from ever entering your home in the first place? Be sure to check in next time for these answers and more!

– the {house}plant momma

 

Spring Cleaning: Plant Edition

Spring is, without a doubt, my favorite time of year. After a gray, cold winter, spring comes in with warm breezes, brightly colored flowers, and longer days full of sun. (Oh, sweet, sweet sunshine!) This winter has seemed to drag on especially long, with snow coming to Ohio all the way into April.

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April showers bring May flowers…

Another aspect of spring that I love is spring-cleaning. I am a self-professed neat freak and a serious germaphob. Add those two together with my Type A personality and…well, you get the picture. Every spring, I look forward to purging unneeded junk we have acquired over the winter, washing every single sheet and towel in sight, and organizing all of our closets, dressers, and cabinets.

There’s another aspect of spring-cleaning that has been on my mind this year – especially after all of the home renovations we have done over the winter – and that is cleaning my plants. Despite my best efforts to dust them off here and there during the winter, or occasionally give them a good rinse in the sink, many of my plants have a fine layer of drywall dust covering their sweet leaves. With the dust blocking the sun’s rays from the leaves, the plants can’t properly photosynthesize, which inhibits their development and could even cause them to die.

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Poor, dusty leaf…

**I’d like to add that I never thought I would use the word “photosynthesize” in my life – ever – so shout out to Mrs. C, my sophomore year biology teacher, for enduring all of my attitude, eye rolls, and attempted manipulation to not do any work. Turns out I learned something after all!

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Here I am at age 16 with the infamous Mrs. C (dressed as “Proton Woman”), and my BFF – a picture of a picture right out of my high school scrapbook!
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Another shot of “Proton Woman”

Well, that was a fun little aside. *clears throat* ANYWAY….

Needless to say, spring-cleaning my plants has been at the forefront of my mind. However, as this is my first spring with plants, I wasn’t quite sure of the best method(s) to clean them. I read up on many different products and methods, and thought I would give some of them a try!

Spraying with Water

Have you ever watched a four-year-old wash their hands unattended? I watch it – literally – everyday. My son is the worst at WASHING his hands. He thinks that by putting one squirt of soap on his hands and instantly washing it off, he has done his due diligence and his hands are “clean.” (Guys, kids are gross. If you have them, then you understand. If you don’t, then you should be forewarned. Gross. Gross. Gross.)

This is what I feel like happens when I spray my plants with water to clean them. All the water does is move around a little of the dust and dirt on the leaves, but as soon as the water dries, the dust is still there, just dried in the shape of water droplets.

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Old dust and dirt dried in the shape of water droplets on my peace lily

While this method feels easiest and might give you the vibe that something good is happening, I don’t really think it’s very effective in actually cleaning the leaves.

Washing with Water

I have, however, found that washing my plants with water is an effective way to clean the leaves. Typically, I put some water on my fingers or a soft cloth; then gently rub the leaf – both top and bottom – clean. When I’m done with all the leaves, I spray the plant down with the sprayer on my sink, just to rinse off any extra dust or dirt that I might have loosened.

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Peace lily much cleaner and happier after an actual WASH in the water!

I would like to add that both of the water cleaning methods are best done in conjunction with watering. If you wash them in addition to watering your plants, there’s a good chance that they will get overwatered and/or possibly flood.

Dusting Glove

For Christmas, my mom got me a microfiber dusting glove as a joke. She forgot, however, with whom she was dealing. I love the glove, and I actually use it frequently when cleaning around the house. My kids think it’s hilarious, and since the glove is big and blue, we refer to it as the “Cookie Monster Hand.”

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Poor monstera…all covered in dust…

I decided to try the microfiber side of the dusting glove on my plants to see if it might effectively remove dust. I feel like this method is preferable to many of the other methods I tried, and it doesn’t include any products that might potentially block the leaves pores, which clearly does more damage than good.

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All ready to soak in that gorgeous spring sunshine!

Overall, I felt like this method was effective – especially on my plants with bigger leaves such as my monstera, snake plants, or pothos. However, for any plants that have smaller leaves, I’m not sure that the big, bulky glove is as effective, as it can’t get into small crevasses. For smaller leaves, I have found that a microfiber cloth does a great job!

Milk and Water

This is a method that I read about on Instagram. One of the accounts I follow (and please forgive me, I cannot remember whose account I saw this on!) said that she was cleaning her leaves with a mixture that was equal parts water and milk. I had never heard of this (and was also pretty skeptical, as I didn’t want my entire house smelling like sour milk), so I decided to do a little research.

Turns out that this is actually a thing called foliar feeding. Apparently, if you have an empty milk container, you can add water to it before throwing it away and can water your plants with that. Or, you can dilute the milk and spray it on the leaves. (If you have skim milk, you can supposedly put that directly on the leaves.) This process is said to give the plants a nutritional boost; additionally, the milk can serve as an antifungal, and and can even potentially cure some of the fungal issues to which some plants are susceptible. (I found this information here.)

However, there is conflicting opinions about this method. Some people contend that using this method might attract pests and potentially make your house smell like sour milk. (NO THANKS!) Another argument against foliar feeding is that, while using food products like milk might make your plant have shiny leaves, it’s not actually doing anything helpful for the plant itself.

I debated trying this process of cleaning/shining leaves with the milk/water solution, but decided against it. I couldn’t run the risk of my house smelling like sour milk or attracting any unwanted pests. (We are currently facing a “lovely” invasion of springtime ants…so I am currently focused on making my house as un-bug-friendly as possible.)

Vinegar and Water

According to the Garden Report website, a good way to remove hard water stains from leaves is to use a weak vinegar solution (1 part vinegar to 5 parts water). This site claims that if you spray the hard water stains and wipe them away with a soft cloth, this will remove the stains.

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Hard water stains on my Christmas Cactus

I have a Christmas Cactus that I purchased at IKEA that has hard water spots (plus dust on top of that!), so I decided to give it a try. I was really nervous to spray something as acidic as vinegar – even in a diluted form – onto my plants (plus it doesn’t smell great), but I went for it.

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A much cleaner and happier Christmas Cactus

I sprayed the solution on my cactus, and wiped it off with a soft cloth. I was pleasantly surprised to see the hard water spots disappear! I’m honestly not sure if the spots disappeared because of the pressure I used when wiping the leaves , or because of the solution. However, this is definitely a method I would try again.

Treating Scale

I currently have a rubber tree that is fighting scale. It is so sad to watch the spots appear on the under sides of the leaves and then watch the life slowly drain from the leaf. I read online that you can use rubbing alcohol to treat the scale spots, which I have been doing for about a month now. Unfortunately, I haven’t seen any improvement.

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Scale up close – GROSS! (Image via BugGuide.net)

My next idea for treating scale was to give neem oil a try. If you haven’t heard of it, neem oil is well known around the plant community, and according to the Today’s Homeowner website:

Neem oil is made from the seeds of the neem tree (Azadirachta indica), which is native to India. Since ancient times, the neem tree has been prized as a sacred remedy and important ingredient in Ayurvedic medicine. In the garden, neem oil boasts a powerful insecticidal ingredient, azadirachtin, which makes it a great organic choice for controlling a variety of problems.

Because of all of these fantastic properties, neem oil can be used to combat insects, fungus, and even some kinds of plant disease. Additionally, it’s nontoxic (meaning that it won’t hurt predatory wasps, honeybees, earthworms, ants, spiders, ladybugs, and adult butterflies, as well as being nontoxic to humans, birds, and other animals), organic (meaning it’s plant-based and it’s easy to find a brand that is organically grown), and biodegradable (meaning it breaks down easily and has no lasting residue).

The jury is still out on if the neem oil is going to help with the scale…I’m going to keep applying, though, and will see if I can save my poor little rubber tree!

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After all of these cleaning experiments, I’m pretty sure I have the cleanest plants in Columbus, Ohio. (HA!) But seriously, I have learned a lot, and have gathered some new methods of keeping my plants healthy and happy. I am hoping that all of the cleaning I have done will  help all of my plants have a healthy, happy summer!

What methods do you use to clean your plants? Is there a product that I didn’t try that you swear by? I hope that you’ll take the time to tell me about it in the comments below.

– the {house}plant momma

 

Stump

Before my family and I were even thinking of moving to Columbus, Ohio, I had already scoped out the plant scene here. As part of my search, I stumbled upon Stump’s Italian Village location. The moment I walked into the store, I was surrounded by what can only be described as “art.” The dark walls and carefully placed lighting accentuated the incredible greenery and handmade ceramics all around. I could instantly tell this was a special place.

While I have visited Stump on multiple occasions, including a workshop I took in the fall, I had only had a chance to chat briefly with owners Emily and Brian Kellett. It was a pleasure to sit down with them several weeks ago and learn more about Stump. With Ray, the sweetest shop “mascot” you will ever meet, lying sleepily on the floor at their feet, Emily and Brian shared their story with me.

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Ray was thoroughly unimpressed with my attempts to take her picture…

Before Emily and Brian met, Emily went to school for industrial design with a focus on design research; as part of one of her projects, she researched what the future of garden retail could potentially look like. At the time, many garden centers across the country were having difficulty remaining relevant year-round, as almost all of their sales were made in the spring. Additionally, many garden centers struggled with appealing to people of different generations, ethnicities, etc. Emily traveled around the country, visiting different garden centers, and interviewed owners, employees, and customers about their experiences.

Around that time, Emily and Brian met when some mutual friends invited them both out for drinks. Brian was teaching full-time, going to Ohio State University for his doctorate, and was working to help with the design of Rockmill Brewery. However despite both being insanely busy, the two hit it off and began dating. With their corresponding backgrounds, they dreamed of starting a plant business together.

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At first, Emily and Brian considered running a plant booth at a farmer’s market or owning a plant truck that would host pop-ups in the Columbus area. However, when a retail space became available about two and a half years ago – the space where they are now located in Italian Village – they took a leap of faith and decided to launch their business as a brick and mortar space instead.

“The outside [of the building] was kind of a mess, but it had potential” Emily says, laughing. The building was light gray with green trim, and had lots of cracks in the exterior finish. The inside featured lime green walls and fluorescent lights. (Sounds lovely, right?!) After some TLC from Emily and Brian, along with their friends and family, they transformed the space, and within a month, they opened the shop. (Fun fact: Stump opened its doors exactly one year to the day from when Emily and Brian met.) Less than two years later in February 2017, Stump opened its second location in German Village.

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Stump’s German Village Location

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Working together at Stump only brought Emily and Brian closer together. (Let me tell you how LUCKY they are…because I’m not so sure I could work in such close proximity to someone I also lived with…ha!). Last month, in March 2018, Emily and Brian eloped to Rocky Mountain National Park!

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Woohoo! Congratulations Emily and Brian! (Image courtesy of Stump)

Something else that makes Stump really special is that they carry an ever-rotating collection of curated, handmade ceramics. When they first started, they facilitated several artist residencies, where ceramic artists came into the shop and created pieces of art on the premises. These pieces of art bring something special to the shop, and work to compliment the beautiful plants that they hold.

Emily and Brian are currently expanding Stump with the recent purchase of 10 acres of land outside of Columbus. They are planning to build a greenhouse on there so that they can keep extra inventory on hand, as well as grow some of their own plants. They also plan to reinstate the artist residency program once they build a ceramic studio on that property.

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Before ending our time together, I asked Emily and Brian if they had any tips for those just beginning their plant journey. One tip they had was to select a forgiving plant to start. Stump always keeps ZZ plants and snake plants in stock, as they are some of the best plants for beginners. They also have extremely knowledgeable staff members on hand that are able to advise customers on the right plant for their own, personal space.

Another thing that Stump does to make their customers have a successful plant experience is that they fill out a plant care card for every plant they sell. The card indicates the name of the plant, how often the plant should be watered, and the type of light the plant needs. This is fantastic for any plant owner – especially new ones!

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Emily and Brian are seriously some of the nicest people I have met during my time in Columbus. Case in point: Emily ended our interview together with a hug. I love getting to know the people behind the plant stores I love, and getting to know Emily and Brian a little has only made me want to shop at Stump even more.

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If you are from the Columbus area or are ever visiting, you must check out one of Stump’s locations! They are located in Italian Village at 305 E. 5th Avenue (Monday thru Saturday, 11:00-6:00 and Sunday, 12:00-5:00) and German Village at 220 Thurman Avenue (Monday thru Friday, 11:00-6:00 and Saturday/Sunday, 10:00-5:00). If you stop by, be sure to tell them that the {house}plant momma sent you!

To learn more about Stump…
Website: http://stumpplants.com
Instagram: @stumpplants
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/stumpplants/

– the {house}plant momma

Spring Awakening

I’m baaaaaaaaack!

After a winter away from the world of blogging, I have returned! Spring is a time of restoration and renewal – not just in the natural world, but also for individuals. The gloom that winter brings – gray days, ice and snow, tree skeletons framing the sky – prevents not only plants from growing, but people, too.

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This winter, I have been buried. Not under depression, as I have spent many winters before, but under “life.” I am currently working two part-time jobs, working to renovate my house, and trying to balance all the aspects of being a good wife and mother. We’ve also battled sickness after sickness this winter. (Um, hand-foot-mouth is LITERALLY the most disgusting thing to ever happen in the history of ever.) It’s honestly been overwhelming. I keep waiting for life to “calm down,” but it seems that never happens. There’s been no time for me to breathe, no time for me to pursue my hobbies, no time for myself.

Real talk: winter has been hard.

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But warmer days are coming. Days filled with blue skies and balmy breezes. Days with sunshine from sun up to sundown. Days without feeling quite so “buried.” I feel winter lifting.

My plants can feel it, too. This winter has been hard on them. I have lost at least 15 plants for various reasons. Some of them died from lack of sun, as they couldn’t seem to thrive no matter where I tried to move them in the house. Others needed more moisture than I could provide (let me tell you that running a heater almost 24/7 makes a house as dry as can be!). Still others died just because…well, I really can’t figure out what happened. They just gave up the ghost.

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However, across the last few weeks, I see signs of spring bursting from my plants. My monstera – who is still pouting from our move last September – is starting to put out some new shoots. All of my tradescantia varieties are growing new baby leaves, and are reaching out their vines. Two of my snake plants have brand new shoots pushing out of the soil.

Spring signifies hope in so many ways.

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I know I have been absent for quite some time, but I hope that you will come along with me as I continue blogging about my plant journey. I know there is still tons left to experience in this {house}plant world, and I have a whole list of new blog topics to share with you.

What do you say? Will you join me?

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– the {house}plant momma

A Touch of Magic: All About Propagation

I have to confess something: I am a huge Harry Potter fan. When my husband and I first started dating, I noticed that he had the entire series of books in his closet. Now, not to say anything bad about my sweet hubby but…he’s not really a reader. He’d rather sit down and play his guitar for hours on end or play a video game.

When I asked him about the books, he enthusiastically told me that I absolutely had to read them because they were amazing. I had read the first book – Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone – in college and liked it well enough, but not enough to pursue reading the other books. However, upon his high praise and recommendation, I dove into the series.

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Image via Warner Brothers

He was right. The books were fantastic. I fell in love with each of the characters in their own right, absolutely dying inside when one of them was killed, cheering on Dumbledore’s army, swooning over the love story interwoven into the action. After reading the second book, I couldn’t stop…until I read the entire series. I was devastated when I finished the last book because there was no more. And so, I decided to start back at the very beginning again.

Further proof of my obsession: I almost named my daughter “Luna” because I love Luna Lovegood so much…

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Seriously my favorite… (Image via Warner Brothers)
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Can we say #freespirit? (Image via Warner Brothers)

In my opinion, one of the most enticing parts of Harry Potter is the idea of magic. We see the concept all around us – from Disney movies to video games, fantasy computer games to books like the Harry Potter series. How many times I have wished I could say, “Accio water!” from bed, and a glass of water would magically float into my room, or “Silencio!” when my three-year-old has asked me “why” 30000000 times in one hour.

Unfortunately, in the world outside of J.K. Rowling’s imagination is far less magical. If I want a glass of water, I have to march down to the kitchen to get it myself…and I have to answer “why” 30000001 times.

But there is one area of life that I consider to be simply magical, and that is propagation. It is simply amazing to me that one day, I put a seemingly nondescript plant cutting into water and when I check on it later – even sometimes as few as several days later – there are roots emerging from the stem.

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I know it’s not magic, but to me the experience is magical.

My dining room gets awesome afternoon sun, and is where I have my little propagation station set up right now. I use a variety of jars and bottles for propagation, pretty much anything that will hold water and properly support the cuttings (i.e. I don’t use a tiny jar for a big cutting).

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My favorite plant by far to propagate is Tradescantia, sometimes known as spiderwort. I have propagated various varitities of this plant, including Tradescantia ‘zebrina’ (Wandering Jew Zebrina), Tradescantia ‘green and white’ (a green and white variegated Wandering Jew), and Bolivian Wandering Jew (Callisia Repens). I have had great luck with getting all three varieties to root in water. Many times, I have taken cuttings off my Wandering Jew Zebrina, have water propagated the cuttings, and have given friends these cuttings once they’ve rooted.

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Once, I tried propagating Tradescantia cuttings in soil only. They did not do well like this, and the stems ended up rotting out.

Another easy plant to propagate is Pothos. I have experimented with propagating several different varieties of Pothos, including Golden Pothos and Marble Pothos. These have done very well for me when I place them in water. In a matter of days, I notice little roots pushing out of the nodes on their stem and in what seems like no time at all, they are ready to place in soil.

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Other plants that I have successfully rooted in water include Ficus benjamina, Syngonium, and Philodendron (although I should say that I have tried multiple varieties and only my Philodendron ‘brasil’ has rooted).

I have also tried propagating my Snake Plant. I have tried using both water propagation and putting cuttings in soil, but neither of these produced any results. The cuttings I put in water just turned to mush, and the cuttings I put into soil ended up drying out. I was very disappointed about these unsuccessful propagations, as Snake Plants are one of my absolute favorite plants!

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I tried propagating some English Ivy and some Tradescantia ‘zebrina’ once in some beautiful hanging wall vases I had. While the Tradescantia ‘zebrina’ rooted, the English Ivy did not and eventually died. Knowing what I know now, I believe it was because that wall didn’t get enough sun. (The Tradescantia ‘zebrina’ rooted much more slowly there than they have rooted when I put them in a more sunny location.)

I have read up on succulent propagation, but have only just recently had a bit of luck with it. I threw some succulent leaves into soil and have been trying to leave them alone (i.e. not water them, poke at them – ha!). I have been lucky enough to see some tiny roots emerge from the leaves, so I am hopeful that they will grow into viable plants eventually.

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I should add that I have never worked with rooting hormones. I know that many of the fellow plant growers/collectors I follow on Instagram use that for more successful propagation. I myself have not experimented with it…yet. I’m sure in the future I’ll want to try something new and will give it a go!

Propagation is such an amazing, magical thing to be a part of. It allows me to expand my plant collection for free, but it also allows me to share my plants with friends – which really is one of my favorite parts the whole plant experience!

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Have you ever experienced the magic of propagation? If so, please tell me about your experiences. Also, if you have tips for me as I move forward with propagating, please feel free to share! I’m always eager to learn more!

– the {house}plant momma

 

 

Essential Oils: The Lifeblood of Plants

Today, I’m super excited that my friend, Laurie, is sharing some unique information about plants – their use in essential oils!  I hope you enjoy the information she shares.  Please also be sure to check out her blog – One Mom and a Blog.

– the {house}plant momma

There’s something so refreshing about adding a plant to your indoor living environment. Perhaps it’s the colors and textures of nature juxtaposed with man-made things. Maybe it’s their “living” presence in the room or the fresh air they provide. Although not all plants are suitable to be brought indoors, the ones that are allow us to grow our love for these fragile creatures by tending to their needs. The simple act of caring for a houseplant can teach the patience, persistence and perseverance needed to nurture nature. Just like tending a garden, the hard work of sowing, watering, and providing a favorable environment will reap reward over time.

Whatever the reason you enjoy the presence of plants, allow me to enrich your appreciation by expanding on their hidden beauty – a beauty that flows deep inside the leaves, stems, flowers, roots, or bark of certain plants and provides something more than meets eye – something that dates back through ancient history.

What Are Essential Oils?

For thousands of years people have been using the aromatic, volatile liquid that’s within many shrubs, flowers, trees, roots, bushes, and seeds. These liquids are known as essential oils and are usually extracted through steam distillation, hydrodistillation, or cold-pressed extraction. Highly concentrated, and far more potent than dried herbs, large volumes of plant material produce small amounts of a distilled essential oil. For example, it takes 5,000 pounds of rose petals to produce 1 Kilo (2.2 pounds) of valuable rose essential oil.

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Through the process of photosynthesis, certain plants can produce more than food! They also convert nutrients into essential oils in order to protect themselves from sickness and insect damage.

Plant parts used to distill essential oils include flowers like the ones used to make the lovely fragranced essential oil Ylang Ylang. Flowering tops are used for Clary Sage, fruit is used to produce Bergamot, grasses make Xiang Mao, gum or resin makes valuable Frankincense, leaves and stems make Basil, roots produce Ginger, seeds make Anise and lastly, wood, bark, twigs and needles make essential oils like Cedarwood, Pine, and Spruce.

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These are just a few examples of hundreds of different essential oils that can be found on the market today. Known as “the lifeblood of plants,” essential oils are said to be the immune system of the plant – the building blocks of the plant’s DNA. This analogy helps us understand how essential oils carry vital nutrients throughout a plant so that it stays healthy and strong just like our gut hosts billions of microbes and beneficial bacteria that act as a primary defense against disease in our bodies.

How to Use Essential Oils

Essential oils can support the health and wellness of humans the same way they support the health and wellness of the original plant they were distilled from – oxygenating and detoxifying where needed most. Working to support every body system, their therapeutic properties promote healthy brain function, healthy weight, and even emotional support. Fragrance is said the be the substance of memories and research shows that when the pure constituents in essential oils are inhaled it can activate regions of the brain associated with memory, state of mind, and emotion. When inhaled, it only takes 22 seconds for an essential oils to reach the brain!

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Using essential oils to support healthy body function through topical or internal use are just a few of the many ways these versatile substances can be appreciated. Like houseplants, essential oils can also clean and purify the air! Houseplants do this by absorbing gases through pores on the surface of their leaves, but essential oils not only replace toxic fragrances like those in sprays, candles, and plug-in’s, they can also neutralize toxic molecules when diffused or sprayed into the air. Can your odor-eliminating spray do that?

Quality Matters

As we reach the understanding that nutrients, beneficial microbes, and bacteria are key to fending off disease in our bodies, it is important to recognize that the health of plants works much the same way. When we stuff our bodies full of food that is void of nutrition or we kill beneficial microbes and bacteria with the overuse of antibiotics or obsessive cleanliness, we can expect a weak immune system. It can also be noted that when we experience chronic stress our immune system is also weakened.

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You might be thinking, “Wait a minute, plants don’t eat or take antibiotics.” But those of you who understand the liveliness of plants know that providing your plants with fertilizer and growing them in the right type of soil and sunlight is the equivalent of a healthy, well-balanced meal in a human being. Likewise, when plants experience stress they are more vulnerable to experiencing pest or disease issues. Poisonous pesticides and synthetic fertilizers can be considered “junk food” for plants rendering them unhealthy.

The reason it is important to care about the soil and nutrients that are provided to the plants that will eventually be distilled into essential oils is that the quality of the plants being used matters! Lots of variables determine the growth and health of the plants and thus the quality of the essential oil. Purchasing and using essential oils from a trusted source is an important first step in safe and effective use.

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Another factor to take into consideration when choosing what essential oils to buy is purity. Unfortunately many companies today adulterate or extend their essential oils with the use of synthetic-made compounds that are added to the oil. The only way to tell if an oil has been adulterated is through analytical testing using gas chromatography, mass spectroscopy, and an optical refractometer.

Grow Your Love for Plants

I have been so blessed by reading Allison’s blog and watching her Instagram posts breathe life into my feed from nature which we all so desperately need – even if we choose to deny it. Adding houseplants to my life has been an enriching experience and has only enhanced my love and appreciation for essential oils. I’m so thankful for the care that goes into growing the plants that are later distilled into essential oils and frequently used in my home and on my family. Plants remind me of the beauty of nature and the smell of its essential oil is like a salve for my soul.

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Resources:
Gary Young The World Leader in Essential Oils pg. 114
Essential Oils Desk Reference: Sixth Edition pg. 43, pg. 26, pg. 3
Soil is the Immune System of the Garden
youngliving.com/blog

Disclaimer: These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. The information on this site is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please confirm any information obtained from or through this web site with other sources, and review all information regarding any medical condition or treatment with your physician. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment because of something you have read on this website. This post may contain affiliate links for your convenience. For more information, please see Laurie’s disclosure page.  Also, learn more about essential oils by joining her VIP Essential Oil Facebook group here. Thanks! 

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Products I {Heart}: Watering Cans

Ah, watering cans – one of the most basic parts of plant care. Do you have a special watering can you use when you water your plant babes? I’ll be honest…I am super-duper lame when it comes to watering my plants: I use an old water bottle the inevitably ends up spilling everywhere. (I frequently have to go grab a towel and clean up before my husband sees the mess; he gets unhappy and gripes that I’m “going to ruin the furniture with water damage…”)

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Image via @philos_and_fern

I have to tell you, though, whenever I look through my Instagram feed or on Pinterest and see a picture with an attractive watering can, it immediately catches my eye. There’s definitely something to be said for making all parts of your surroundings beautiful. Gone are the days where your watering can has to be a big clunky green monstrosity; there are so many cute – and unique – options out there!

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Image via The Future Kept

Today, I want to share some of my favorite watering cans with you. (And, with any luck, maybe Santa will bring me one of these for Christmas! <hint hint>)

Polished Watering Can

Anthro Metallic WC
Image via Anthropologie

Modern Copper Watering Can

West Elm Copper WC
Image via West Elm

Stainless Steel Watering Can

Amazon Stainless Steel WC
Image via Amazon

Hammered Copper Watering Can

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Image via Amazon

Adorable Elephant Watering Can

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Image via Amazon

White Classic Watering Can

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Image via Hayneedle

When Pigs Fly Watering Can

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Image via Amazon

Circular Brass Watering Can

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Image via Amazon

Ikea BITTERGURKA Watering Can (comes in several colors)

Ikea BITTERGURKA WC.jpg
Image via IKEA

Haws Solid Copper Watering Can

Anthro Copper WC.jpg
Image via Anthropologie

Have you found other watering cans you like as you have meandered through the Internet? If so, please share them with me in the comments section below. I’m always looking for something new and inspiring…and there’s still time to adjust my list to Santa!

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– the {house}plant momma