The 8 Best Plants for Your Space: Low Light

Recently, I have been adding to my side-hustle ventures (because I needed one more thing to do, right??), and have been selling some baby plants. As I have interacted with customers through this process, I have learned that most people don’t know which plants will do well in their spaces. This makes me think that perhaps there isn’t enough information out there (or people don’t know where to look) about what plants do well in different types of light.

And thus this three-part series – The Best Plants for Your Space – was born. Together, we will look at some of the best plants for your space based on the plant’s light requirement. I hope this will be helpful information!

When I first got started with houseplants, I had a cute little hanging planter that was designed to mount on the wall. I planted a succulent (which needed bright light) in the planter…and promptly hung it on a wall that was far from a window. I couldn’t figure out why my plant wasn’t thriving – that is, until I learned more about plants.

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Low light planters in my house – now holding the CORRECT plants for their location!

Today, we are going to look at plants that enjoy low light – the type of plant that would have been perfect in my little wall planter!

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ZZ plants do great in low light. In fact, once I was told that they could even survive in florescent light ONLY. (Dang, these guys are resilient!) ZZ plants also enjoy a dry environment. They are a great plant for beginners, as they basically thrive on neglect!

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Snake plants are another plant that does well in low light. I have seen in my own home, though, that while they will survive in low light, they will produce more growth when they are in moderate light. However, I have several stuck in dark corners because they look so dang cool there, and the plants are doing great. Keep in mind that snake plants need to dry out completely between waterings.

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Ivy – specifically English ivy – does well in low light settings. I have kept several varieties in my own home, and they are pretty hardy all-around. Just keep in mind they are another variety that likes to dry out between waterings.

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Pothos is a great go-to plant for beginners. Not only is it easy to find and relatively cheap to buy, but it is super forgiving. Pothos does best in low to moderate light and should be allowed to dry out between waterings to prevent root-rot. If you are new to houseplants, this is definitely a plant that you should try out!

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Philodendrons, similarly to pothos, are great for beginners as many of the varieties are very forgiving. They do well in low to moderate light and like to be allowed to dry out between waterings. Plus, there are so many different varieties – some that trail/vine, others that are more “bushy” – that it’s impossible to get bored.

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Ferns – specifically button, rabbit’s foot, and maidenhair ferns – are great for low-light spaces; however, I will warn you – they are a little less user-friendly than some of the plants on this list. Typically, ferns like to have their soil kept moist and don’t like any direct light.

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Peace lilies are not only great for keeping the air in your home clean but are also a plant that does well in low light. They like having soil that is consistently moist; if allowed to dry out, they will dramatically “wilt,” although they can usually be revived with a good drink of water.

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Calatheas are another plant that thrives in low light, but they can be finicky. (I, personally, have lost several calatheas by not providing the correct conditions for them.) They thrive in soil that is constantly moist, and they also appreciate high air humidity.

If you are new to houseplants and have low-light spaces, I would definitely recommend starting off with a pothos or philodendron. If you are more experienced with houseplants but are looking to fill a dark corner, you may feel brave enough to take on a fern or calathea.

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What if you have areas that get a medium amount of light? Check back next time to learn about plants that would be perfect in that space!

- the {house}plant momma.png

Products I {Heart}: Concrete Planters

For Christmas last year, my oldest son Alex (who had just turned 13) made me a special surprise. He came across a video on Instagram that showed how to make your own concrete planters. Knowing my love of plants, he took the video to my husband and said, “I want to make those for Mom.”

About a week before Christmas, both my husband and son spent a Saturday afternoon, cooped up in the basement; weird smells streamed from under the closed door. I was suspicious, but was told I wasn’t allowed to go see what was going on…that Alex was making me a present and I had to roll with it. (I am NOT a flexible, ”roll-with-it” kind of girl…but I sucked it up and endured.)

On Christmas morning, Alex proudly handed me a gift bag that was strangely heavy. I couldn’t figure out what could possibly be inside! When I parted the tissue paper, I found three awesome concrete planters inside, each one decorated with a unique design painted on with spray paint (hence the mysterious smell). I am NOT a crier, but I almost burst into tears I was so incredibly touched!

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Awesome planters made by my biggest boy!

Concrete planters are majorly on trend right now and add a unique touch to any décor. I have seen a lot of the awesome planters online lately and, while none of them will ever be as special or amazing as the ones made for me by my Alex (insert alllllll the heart eyes), I wanted to share some of my favorites with you.

Cube Concrete Planter with Metallic Paint

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Image via Etsy

Octagonal Concrete Planter

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Image via Etsy

Geometric Concrete Air Plant Holders – Set of 3

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Image via Etsy

Cube Concrete Planter

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Image via Etsy

 

Mini Mod Style Concrete Planter

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Image via Etsy

Stairway Concrete Planter

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Image via Etsy

Hanging Cone Concrete Planter

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Image via Etsy

Brontosaurus Dinosaur Concrete Planter

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Image via Etsy

Rose Gold Cylinder Concrete Planter

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Image via Etsy

Mini Geometric Concrete Planter

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Image via Etsy

I have yet to experiment with making concrete planters myself, but I hope that one day soon, I will have the time – and courage – to give it a try! (And, if I do, you can be sure I will have pictures to show you of my adventure!)

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Which concrete planter is your favorite? Tell me in the comments below!

- the {house}plant momma.png

 

Poison! Stay Back!

Every time my mother-in-law comes over, she brings gifts. It’s not generally anything big – a pack of gum for my oldest son, homemade tortillas, change for the kids’ to jingle into their piggy banks – but she likes to bring something special when she comes.

A year or so before my husband and I got married, she brought me a lovely white potted Easter lily. I was thrilled by the wonderful-smelling white flowers, and proudly set the pot by the sink in my kitchen where I could see it often.

However, a few hours later as I was doing dishes, I noticed that a few of the petals looked beat up and one of the leaves had a rip in it. I shrugged it off, turning my attention to other things.

It was then that I discovered cat vomit on the carpet…and in the midst I could see lily petals. Apparently, my cat Felix (who is notorious for being generally naughty!) was the cause of the beat up petals and ripped leaf. I was annoyed! That little scoundrel had ruined my beautiful plant.

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Felix the Cat (a.k.a. Mr. Mischief)

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Even in the midst of my annoyance, I turned to the Internet to see if he would experience any ill effects from his snack, and what I found turned my stomach. As it turns out, Easter lilies are highly toxic when eaten by cats; even ingesting a small portion (including drinking water from the vase) can cause acute kidney failure. Needless to say, I was extremely worried (and quickly forgave him), and spent the evening watching him like a hawk. Luckily, Felix experienced no ill effects of his Easter lily snack. However, since then, I have been much more cautious about the plants I bring into my home.

Have you ever wondered about the effects your houseplants might have if a beloved cat or dog decided to munch on one as a snack? If you haven’t considered this before, it’s important that you are aware of the effects your plants could have if they were ingested by your pets. Below you can see a list of 10 common poisonous houseplants that are poisonous to cats and dogs.

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Recently, my best friend was asking me if I knew about plants that could be added into her home that were cat-friendly, as she has kitties who like to gnaw on things. The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) is a wonderful resource for that information, as they have a complete list of plants that poisonous to pets, as well as plants that are safe to have around cats and dogs.

ASPCA Dog Plant List

ASPCA Cat Plant List

If you have never considered the toxicity of the plants you currently have in your home, take a minute to look them up and be sure that you are keeping your furry friends safe!

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What “pet children” do you have in your home that you’d like to protect? Tell me about them in the comments below!

– the {house}plant momma